• Position
    • Primary Discipline
    • Expertise
    • Approach
    • Methods
    Members
    Agathe DIRANI
    Researcher
    Education/Special Education, Sociology
    Researcher
    Article 1 - Frateli Lab
    Institut de recherche sur l'Education (IREDU), Université de Bourgogne
    agathe.dirani@fratelilab.fr
    Research Summary

    Students from an underprivileged background do face specific forms of socialization due to their experience of social mobility. In this context, we try to understand the construction of their representations regarding their own trajectories and more specifically on what they define as a success in their trajectory. Thanks to qualitative and quantitative longitudinal methods including mentees and mentors, we analyse the effects of the mentoring programme on the construction of these representations and their subjective experience of social mobility.

    Allouch, Annabelle, et Hélène Buisson-Fenet. « Diversification des élites et repositionnement organisationnel ». Cahiers de la recherche sur l’éducation et les savoirs, no 7, 2008, 155‑71.
    Clemence, Alain, Willem Doise, et Fabio Lorenzi-Cioldi. The Quantitative Analysis of Social Representations. Routledge, 2014.
    Jaquet, Chantal. 2014. Les transclasses, ou, La non-reproduction. 1re édition. Paris: Presses universitaires de France.
    Negura, Lilian. « L’analyse de contenu dans l’étude des représentations sociales ». SociologieS, 2006, 1-16.
    Orange, Sophie. 2013. « L’autre enseignement supérieur: les BTS et la gestion des aspirations scolaires ». Paris: Presses universitaires de France.
    Pagis, Julie, et Pasquali, Paul, Observer les mobilités sociales en train de se faire, Observing Social Mobility in the Making. Politix, n°14, 2016, 7–20.
    Pasquali, Paul. « Les enfants de l’« ouverture sociale » Agora débats/jeunesses, no 53, 2001, 117‑34.
    Truong, Fabien, Jeunesses françaises, Paris : La découverte, 2015


    Biographical Info

    After a Master Degree in Political sciences I work on public projects directed to young people with the French Ministry of Youth (INJEP). Then I completed a PhD in Education from the University of Burgundy in 2017. I worked on creativity as a specific ressource having impacts on educational and professional inequalities. As a researcher on the Mentoring programme set up by the french NGO Article 1, I work on measuring the social mobility of students and the subjective experience of this mobility with a focus on the mentees representations of success. I also work on what really counts in the Mentoring programme settings.


    Keywords: inequalities, social justice, creativity, mentoring, social mobility, youth trajectories
    Trev Down
    Researcher
    Ethnography
    Researcher
    Royal Air Force
    University of Wolverhampton
    trevor_down@hotmail.com
    Research Summary

    My research title is the Conceptualisation of mentoring within a military context. It is an ethnographical study utilising 5/6 case studies looking at the various formal/informal mentoring set ups across the Royal Air Force.


    Biographical Info

    I am a commissioned officer within the Royal Air Force and am currently studying for a Professional Doctorate in Education at The University of Wolverhampton. My previous qualifications include a MA in Education, PGCE in Mentoring in Education and PGCE in Strategic Leadership.


    Alison Drew
    Postdoctoral Fellow
    Social Work
    Postdoctoral Fellow
    Boston University
    alison.l.drew@gmail.com
    Biographical Info

    My research focuses on individual, relational and organizational factors that influence youth mentoring relationships, using quantitative and qualitative methods to enhance the quality and quantity of youth mentoring relationships through evidence-informed practice. I previously worked as a Match Support Specialist at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Massachusetts Bay and served as an AmeriCorps Ambassador of Mentoring at Mass Mentoring Partnership.


    Gizem Erdem
    Faculty Member
    Psychology, Other
    Assistant Professor
    Koç University
    gizemerdem@ku.edu.tr
    Website
    Research Summary

    My research interests are program development and evaluation targeting at-risk youth and their families. I am particularly interested in interventions that promote positive youth development and resilience among youth via fostering functional family processes and healthy adult-youth relationships. I have been interested in youth mentoring research since my post-doctoral year. I have projects that investigate the role natural mentoring relationships for at-risk youth, examine the impact of peer mentoring for mentors and mentees and their parents as well as cultural variations in youth mentoring. Me and my colleagues have developed a rehabilitation model for youth in probation where probation officers assess and advocate for youth's needs to prevent recidivism. Our model (inspired by youth mentoring practices and evidence based family therapy for juvenile delinquents) is currently running in 21 cities across Turkey.


    Biographical Info

    Gizem Erdem is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Koç University, İstanbul, Turkey. She is a licensed marriage and family therapist and a clinical supervisor. She obtained her BA degree in Psychology from Boğaziçi University, Turkey and her MS and PhD in Human Development and Family Science (with specialization in Couple and Family Therapy) from the Ohio State University, US. She was a post-doc researcher at University of Illinois at Chicago from January through December 2014 and a visiting scholar at Harvard University in Summer 2017. She was awarded 2013 NCFR Student Award, 2018 NCFR President for a day Award in the US and 2019 Academy of Sciences Young Scientist Award in Turkey for her research with marginalized youth and families. She consults UNODC, Turkish Ministry of Justice, NMRC and UNICEF in evidence-based practices to reduce youth delinquency, crime, and substance abuse.


    Sam Flaherty
    Undergraduate
    Social Work
    Program Coordinator
    Wimmera Southern Mallee LLEN - MATES Mentoring Program
    sam.flaherty@llen.com.au
    MATES Mentoring Website
    Research Summary

    As part of my third year studies I undertook a research project in conjunction with the MATES Mentoring Program.
    The DeckHeads Project: The primary focus of the research is to establish whether an alternate artistic project can create positive life experiences in disengaged youth. To be able achieve, this I requested that each participant design and create their own unique skateboard decks with the themes “what makes me happy now” and “what will make me happy in the future?”. The created artworks were then displayed at The Horsham Regional Art Gallery where an event was held to launch the exhibition of artwork. Participants, teaching staff, parents/guardians, partner organisations and members of the community were invited to the event to showcase the creations. Each artist was awarded with a customised certificate with their name and the name of their skateboard deck in recognition of their contributions in participating in the project. The decks planned to be on display at the Horsham Regional Art Gallery for the week following the launch – this has hence been extended due to interest in the project from the public and the extended availability of the presentation space. Two weeks after the launch of the exhibition, participants were asked to complete a survey based on their experiences throughout the DeckHeads Project – these survey results are what will be analysed to determine if alternate art projects can create positive life experiences in youth.


    Biographical Info

    I currently coordinate the MATES Mentoring Program which provides positive role models who mentor, assist, target, engage and enhance the skills and life experiences of young people. MATES matches young people (mentees) with a volunteer (mentor) from the local community. Mentors and mentees catch up for one hour, once a fortnight for one year. MATES is a great way to volunteer in the community.


    Judie GANNON
    Faculty Member
    Other
    Dr
    Oxford Brookes University
    Oxford Brookes University
    jmgannon@brookes.ac.uk
    International Centre for Coaching & Mentoring Studies STAMINa network
    Twitter
    Research Summary

    My research focus is on mentoring (and coaching) and specifically the management of formal mentoring schemes. I have recently published a report Many things to Many People: Formal Mentoring Schemes and their Management 2019. This is first widescale study of formal mentoring schemes, their organisation and those that operate them. This is based on a mixed methods study of formal mentoring schemes and their management. I have researched and written on mentoring in organisations, mentoring as a socialisation practice and various aspects of IHRM for a range of publications - peer reviewed academic journals (International Journal of Human Resource Management) and practitioner journals (Coaching at Work).


    Biographical Info

    I am a senior lecturer in the International Centre for Coaching & Mentoring Studies (ICCaMs). I lead and teach and supervise on our Doctorate in Coaching & Mentoring, and also teach on our MA in Coaching and Mentoring Practice and the MA/MSc programmes in HRM. I also undertake doctoral research supervision across the Business School. I also support the delivery of our ILM Level 7 in Executive Coaching and Mentoring certificate and organise the Oxford Brookes Coaching & Mentoring Society (OBCaMs) network events across the academic year. I am a member of the core team of the PESE Sustainable Mentoring schemes initiative at Oxford Brookes University and lead the STAMINa Mentoring Network which focuses on sharing best practice across mentoring schemes and offering support to mentoring scheme coordinators. In 2008/9 I founded the Bacchus Mentoring programme and subsequently supported several other University departments (Accountancy, Real Estate and Law) in setting up and running Alumni mentoring schemes.


    Leah Glass
    Researcher
    Education/Special Education, Ethnography, Sociology
    Associate Director of Organizational Learning
    iMentor
    CUNY Graduate Center
    lglass@imentor.org
    Research Summary

    Leah Glass is a current PhD student in sociology at the Graduate Center, CUNY. Her research examines how racism is manifested in various institutions: non-profits, the education system, and even soccer. Her current work explores how "diversity" discourse and initiatives are experienced by staff at non-profits and reproduce racist structures.

    Leah is a critical, mixed-methods researcher. Formally trained in quantitative methods from NYU's Applied Quantitative Research program, she frequently uses ethnography, participant observation, and interviews in conjunction with surveys and other quantitative analyses.


    Konrad Glogowski
    Researcher
    Education/Special Education
    Director, Research and Evaluation
    Pathways to Education
    kglogowski@pathwayscanada.ca
    Website
    Twitter
    Research Summary

    I am interested in exploring the impact of mentoring, both community- and school-based, on the development of non-cognitive sills in adolescents as well as their academic attainment and trajectories into adulthood. I am particularly interested in how mentoring can support marginalized youth, including youth living in contexts of risk and disadvantage, first generation youth, refugee and newcomer populations. My work in the non-profit sector focuses on improving programming through research and evaluation, student-centred approaches, meaningful integration of technology, innovative professional communities of practice, and peer mentorship networks.


    Biographical Info

    Konrad Glogowski holds a Ph.D. degree in Education from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto, with a focus on adolescent literacy and teacher development and a Master of Arts in Teaching from the same institution. His experience in education spans several continents and a variety of teaching, research, and program development roles.

    Konrad is currently Director of Research and Evaluation at Pathways to Education Canada, a national charitable organization that strives to provide at-risk youth with the support they need to complete school, achieve their full potential, break the cycle of poverty, and contribute back to their communities. Konrad’s research interests focus on community-based research and adolescent learning and development, with a particular focus on mentoring and student-centred programming for marginalized students.


    Grace Gowdy
    Faculty Member
    Social Work
    Assistant Faculty
    North Carolina A&T
    ggowdy@bu.edu
    Biographical Info

    Grace Gowdy (Ph.D., Boston University), Assistant Professor. Dr. Gowdy's research interests include community and family influence on individual upward mobility, with a particular focus on the adolescent and young adult stages. Her dissertation was on informal mentors and their ability to promote economic upward mobility for low-income youth. Dr. Gowdy currently works on multiple studies examining formal and informal mentoring relationships, all surrounding how caring non-parental adults can influence young people's chances of mobility.


    Nicolas Greenfield
    Other
    Other
    Coordinator, Development & Training
    YMCAs of Quebec
    nicolas.greenfield@ymcaquebec.org
    Plusone Mentoring
    Johanna Greeson
    Faculty Member
    Social Work
    Associate Professor
    University of Pennsylvania
    School of Social Policy & Practice
    jgreeson@sp2.upenn.edu
    Website
    Twitter
    Research Summary

    The transition to adulthood among youth who age out of foster care
    Natural mentoring and other supportive adult relationships for youth who age out of foster care
    Child traumatic stress
    Applied community-based intervention research and translation of research to practice
    Resiliency, risk, and protective factors
    Neurobiological mechanisms of resiliency-focused interventions
    Life course theory
    Domestic minor sex trafficking


    Biographical Info

    Johanna Greeson, PhD, MSS. MLSP, is an Associate Professor at the School of Social Policy & Practice at the University of Pennsylvania. She is passionate about reforming the child welfare system, using research to build better futures for youth who age out of foster care, and realizing the power of connections to caring adults for all vulnerable youth. Her research agenda is resiliency-focused and based in the strengths and virtues that enable foster youth to not only survive but thrive. Dr. Greeson’s published work includes scholarly articles on natural mentoring, evidence-based practices for older youth in foster care, including independent living programming, residential group care, and intensive in-home therapy, low-income homeownership, child/adolescent traumatic stress, and domestic minor sex trafficking. Her work has been cited over 1,000 times in the scientific, peer-reviewed literature. She is the developer of Caring Adults ‘R’ Everywhere (C.A.R.E.), a novel, trauma-informed natural mentoring intervention for older youth in foster care, intended to solve the aging out dilemma. Dr. Greeson received her PhD in social work from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2009 and completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at Duke University with the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress in 2012. She is also an alumna of Swarthmore, where she majored in Sociology/Anthropology – Education and graduated in 1997. She received her Master of Social Service and Master of Law & Social Policy degrees from Bryn Mawr in 2001. She joined the faculty of the School of Social Policy Practice at Penn in 2012.


    Matthew Hagler
    Graduate Student
    Doctoral Candidate
    Center for Evidence-Based Mentoring
    University of Massachusetts Boston
    Matthew.Hagler001@umb.edu
    Rachel Halzel

    Youth Advocacy Manager
    Buddy Mentors at Bright Future Foundation
    rachel@mybrightfuture.org
    Buddy Mentors
    Matt Hanson
    Other
    Niganawenimaanaanig Program Student Mentor
    Bemidji State University
    Niganawenimaanaanig Indigenous Nursing Program
    matthew.hanson@bemidjistate.edu
    Jenna Harmon
    Researcher
    Other
    Mentorship Research Lead
    Mentor Collective
    jenna@mentorcollective.org
    Kathy Hauser

    Director of Service Delivery
    BBBS of Saskatoon and Area, Inc.
    kathy.hauser@bigbrothersbigsisters.ca
    Biographical Info

    Kathy Hauser has worked at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Saskatoon and Area, Inc. for over 20 years. She has been in her current role as the Director of Service Delivery since 2006.


    Eline Heppe
    Postdoctoral Fellow
    Other
    Postdoc
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
    e.c.m.heppe@vu.nl
    Biographical Info

    I am a behavioural scientist with a special interest in research among young people with disabilities and their families. My PhD research on mentoring and social participation of young people with a visual impairment; explored new ways to support young people with disabilities.


    Julie Hilt
    Other
    Anthropology, Social Work
    CEO
    Alternative Restorative Communities, LLC
    Solano County Probation
    Juliehilt@gmail.com
    Website
    Biographical Info

    Julie Hilt is a Restorative Justice Practitioner with a wide range of experience. She co-facilitated the first restorative conference on San Quentin's death row and facilitated a victim offender education group with adult lifers for two years. Currently she runs weekly groups with incarcerated youth and manages a youth diversion program in the community that has maintained an 85% success rate for two years in a row. In November 2018, in collaboration with Solano County Community College and Solano County Probation, she launched a pilot mentoring program for youth in detention based on London's highly successful XLM model. In 2019, the mentor program was awarded a grant to expand into high schools through out the county. Julie is the founder of Alternative Restorative Communities and is very proud to say that 30% of her colleagues are returning citizens (previously incarcerated).
    She is a licensed trainer with the International Institute of Restorative Practices, and is currently pursuing accreditation with the United Kingdom Restorative Justice Council.


    Anne Hobbs
    Faculty Member
    Sociology, Other
    Director
    The Juvenile Justice Institute
    University of Nebraska Omaha
    ahobbs@unomaha.edu
    Juvenile Justice Institute
    Research Summary

    The following are the projects I was funded for in FY2019.
    1. Evidence Based Programs in Nebraska. This project totaled $309,600.00, and involved collaborating on the development and training on a statewide juvenile justice data collection system for 250 programs funded under Nebraska’s Community Based Juvenile Services Aid Fund. The contract includes conducting program evaluation and recidivism studies of selected community-based aid funded programs.
    2. The Lancaster County Detention Utilization Study was funded by the Office of Probation in the amount of $8,000.00. In this evaluation, I examined data on youth detained in the Lancaster County Juvenile facility and provided policy recommendations for eliminating detention stays not required for community safety.
    3. The Sherwood Foundation funded the Juvenile Reentry project in the amount of $95,150.00. I developed this service-learning project to match undergraduate mentors from college campuses, to youth re-entering a Nebraska community after commitment in a Youth Rehabilitation & Treatment Center. This program now operated on four University campuses and other states are hoping to adopt the mentoring model.
    4. The Connected Youth Initiative was funded by the Nebraska Children’s Foundation in the amount of $4,666.00. This project involved testing a tool that measures the strength of collaboratives and seeks to explain why some collaborations are more successful than others are. The tool empirically tests the interconnection and intensity of collective impact domains across various collaborative models.


    Biographical Info

    I am a licensed attorney, research faculty, and the Director of the Juvenile Justice Institute at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. I have been involved in various juvenile justice reform efforts in the State of Nebraska over the past decade. I serve on a variety of policy-making committees, including: The Nebraska Governor’s Children's Commission (Foster Care Subcommittee), The Traumatic Brain Injury Task Force, the Nebraska DMC Committee and the Nebraska Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative. I have been very involved in evaluating evidence-based initiatives across the State of Nebraska and because of this, I regularly testify before the Nebraska Unicameral on reform of Nebraska’s juvenile justice system. One of my proudest accomplishments is the Juvenile Reentry Program. This project has been continuously funded since 2012, and allows undergraduate criminal justice students to mentor youth in the juvenile justice system. After training, University students are matched to youth, who are incarcerated or receiving treatment. Initial outcomes are promising for both the youth in the system and the University student.


    Lars Holmboe
    Researcher
    Anthropology, Ethnography
    Researcher, developer P.hD.
    Mentorland
    University of Roskilde, Denmark
    lars.interkultur@gmail.com
    Mentorland
    Twitter
    Research Summary

    My dissertation (2012) focuses on what I call inclusive mentoring. That is to say a particular development and empowerment orientated relation where mentor helps the recipient of the mentoring, the mentee, with clarifying and developing professional, personal and social competencies. In my view the mentor relation is a process where an informal transfer of knowledge, social capital and psychosocial support takes place. A knowledge which is perceived by the mentee as relevant in relation to the life situation and personal development he or she is in.

    Inclusive mentor relations produce positive psychosocial capital in the widest sense. The mentees have the opportunity in the inclusive mentor relation to express both positive and negative feelings. Through the mentee’s stories mentor has opportunities to create a space for flexibility and to help the mentee manoeuvre in particularly difficult situations. Particularly valuable relations open up for the mentee’s hidden resources, help with expressing new sides, and open up for the creation of a new identity. Manipulation or hidden agendas can destroy and lead to the production of negative social capital. Conversely, particularly valuable, open and trusting relations produce positive psychosocial added value and contributes towards preventing the exclusion and marginalisation of the mentee. Mentor contributes to facilitating this process.


    Biographical Info

    I am an independent researcher from Denmark focusing on themes such as inclusive mentoring, volunteer work, and mental health. Currently, I focus on developing new forms of mentoring for people recovering from a mental illness, such as peer-to-peer support. I do this through action research. Some years ago, I completed a PhD in anthropology on the topic of inclusive mentoring. I tried to understand what changed for people who got a mentor and why. To study this, I followed people excluded from society over a period of time, two to three years, and interviewed them multiple times. I interviewed both mentees and mentors, and came to understand that mentors can sometimes initiate ‘turning points’ in mentees’ lives. Around that time, I also started the website www.mentorblog.dk, which gives an overview of articles on mentoring in Denmark and some from around the world.

    To understand the current mentoring field in Denmark, it is important to know that the first mentoring programs in Denmark where for adults. The programs were for immigrants who came to Denmark and sometimes experienced problems with integration and entering the labor market. Nowadays, the focus of mentoring in Denmark is still on adults with a distance from the labor market. Some programs work with employed mentors, which is perhaps more comparable to social work than to mentoring, also because mentees are often obliged participate in a mentoring program by their local authorities as part of labor market law.


    Keywords: inclusive mentoring, peer to peer mentoring,
    Saraliz Jimenez
    Other
    Other
    Manager
    College of DuPage
    Latino Outreach Center
    jimene@cod.edu
    Biographical Info

    My name s Saraliz Jimenez, manager of the Latino Outreach Center at College of DuPage. I have worked for 18 years in higher education with young people and their families. I coach, motivate and guide young people and some adults through this massive institution and how to navigate the puddles and road bumps. Planting the seed and watching it grow everyday as we sail through this world and life together. I am a student first and a teacher second.

    Academically, I have achieved two masters degrees and now I enjoy taking courses. Over the last 5 years I have been a part of a great team that has pushed our Latino enrollment at the college from 12% to 24%. I am passionate about what I do, I don't fit the mold that society created for me so I made my own. In the process I have and continue to develop my relationship with my two young children as a single mother and providing them with growth opportunities.


    Figen KARAFERYE
    Faculty Member
    Education/Special Education
    Lecturer Doctor
    Kutahya Dumlupinar University
    figen.karaferye@dpu.edu.tr
    University Portal Page
    Twitter
    Research Summary

    My PhD is in Educational Management & Leadership, I have been working on the management and professional development of the academic staff on various aspects. I have been taking part in the quality improvement units of the school and of the university. I have also actively been taking part in two international research projects -Improving Solutions for Student Absenteeism (ISSA) EU Erasmus+ KA2 and Modern Competences of Academic Teachers - The Key to Modern HEI (MOCAT) National Agency of International Exchange – NAWA, International Academic Partnership Programme.


    Biographical Info

    I have been working as an English Language Lecturer since December 2007 in Kutahya Dumlupinar University. My research interests and areas include faculty professional development, 21st century skills & modernizing teaching, student mentoring & coaching, quality management, and organizational management & leadership. I have actively taken part in the professional development activities in my school. I have designed and implemented a mentoring program for the new lecturers in the school. I have also had some managerial duties – head of the department and co-director of the school. Since my PhD is in Educational Management & Leadership, I have been working on the management and professional development of the academic staff on various aspects. I have also been taking part in the quality improvement units of the school and of the university.


    Thomas Keller
    Faculty Member
    Social Work
    Duncan & Cindy Campbell Professor
    Portland State University
    School of Social Work
    kellert@pdx.edu
    Research Summary

    Development and influence of youth mentoring relationships; social networks in youth mentoring interventions; evaluation of youth mentoring program innovations and enhancements; professional development of mentoring program staff; mentoring of undergraduates in science, biomedical, and health fields.


    Biographical Info

    Thomas E. Keller, PhD, is the Duncan and Cindy Campbell Professor for Children, Youth, and Families in the School of Social Work at Portland State University. He directs the PSU Summer Institute on Youth Mentoring and the PSU Center for Interdisciplinary Mentoring Research and is Co-Investigator of the BUILD EXITO Project as part of the NIH Diversity Program Consortium.


    Lucinda Kelley
    Other
    Education/Special Education
    Assistant Director, Florida's State Personnel Development Grant
    Florida Gulf Coast University
    Florida Department of Education
    lkelley@fgcu.edu
    Biographical Info

    Lucinda Kelley is the assistant director of Florida’s State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG). She has over 30 years of experience in education as both a teacher and administrator. She has worked in both public schools and post-secondary institutions. In her career, Lucinda has worked in small, rural and large Florida public school districts. She has worked in school and district roles serving students from pre-kindergarten to high school. Her experience includes ten years as high school principal and four years as a District Director for Exceptional Student Education and Student services.
    Her major duties and responsibilities with SPDG include providing assistance to the director in the implementation oversight, fiscal management, and program implementation for this grant funded program. SPDG is a faceted, multi-year initiative to support increased graduation rates for students with disabilities via the use of two evidenced practices: Check and Connect and the Strategic Instruction Model. Working across school districts in Florida to provide professional development, ongoing coaching, technical assistance, and fiscal supports in middle/high feeder patterns, the project seeks to increase capacity for schools and districts to support graduation, increased proficiency and decreased dropout rates. This grant works in close partnership with numerous organizations.


    Michael Kelly
    Graduate Student
    Applied Sciences, Education/Special Education, Sociology, Other
    Youth Officer
    Galway Roscommon Education & Training Board
    Waterford Institute of Technology
    mkellymoore@yahoo.co.uk
    Eileen Klemm
    Researcher
    Education/Special Education
    Director
    University of Minnesota
    Institute on Community Integration
    klem0027@umn.edu
    Check & Connect
    Twitter
    Biographical Info

    Klemm is the director of the Check & Connect program area within the Institute on Community Integration at the University of Minnesota. She is the co-principal investigator on two grant funded projects which implement the Check & Connect mentoring intervention. She directs the development of training workshops, technical assistance, publications, and technology that support Check & Connect implementation. Check & Connect is a mentoring intervention used with K-12 students who show warning signs of disengagement with school and are at risk of dropping out. At the core of the program is a trusting relationship between the student and a caring, trained mentor who both advocates for and challenges the student. Since the 1990s, Check & Connect has been successfully implemented in over 40 states across the U.S. and internationally.


    Beatrice Kollinger
    Graduate Student
    Education/Special Education
    PhD- student
    Humboldt- Universität zu Berlin
    beatrice.kollinger@hu-berlin.de
    Sachunterricht und seine Didaktik an der HU
    Biographical Info

    Since April 2018 I'm a PhD-Student at Humboldt- University of Berlin/ department of education. Actually there are two mentoring programms placed in this departement. ‚Kratzeis‘ and ‚Traumasensitive learning‘ want to establish a temporary pedagogical relationship between the studens and the children and support the students to learn reflexive skills. The methodical approaches of my research are qualitative research studies on topic of education.


    Natasha Koper
    Graduate Student
    Psychology, Other
    PhD candidate
    Utrecht University
    Adolescent Development
    n.koper@uu.nl
    Website
    Biographical Info

    Natasha Koper received her bachelor degree in Pedagogical Sciences and her research master degree in Development and Socialisation in Childhood and Adolescence [DaSCA] (cum laude) at Utrecht University, the Netherlands.

    In September 2017, she started working as a research assistant and lecturer at the department of Education & Pedagogy of Utrecht University, the Netherlands.

    In March 2018, she started a PhD studying the effectiveness and working mechanisms of the Youth Initiated Mentoring (YIM) approach as an outpatient alternative for out-of-home care of youth (12-18 years) of multiproblem families. The project is a collaboration between the research center of Adolescent Development of Utrecht University, the department of Forensic Child and Youth Care Sciences of University of Amsterdam, and the YIM foundation. More information about the YIM approach can be found on: http://www.jimwerkt.nl/ (in Dutch).


    Adam Kuhn
    Graduate Student
    Education/Special Education
    Director
    University of Toronto
    Division of Student LIfe
    adam.kuhn@utoronto.ca
    Twitter
    Paul Lachelier
    Other
    Sociology
    Founder & Director
    Learning Life
    Virtual Exchange Coalition
    paul@learninglife.info
    Learning Life
    Twitter
    Research Summary

    My research focuses on project and program evaluation of our Family Diplomacy Initiative and our international mentoring program.


    Biographical Info

    Paul Lachelier is the founder and director of Learning Life, a Washington, DC-based nonprofit lab devoted to innovating education and citizen engagement. Learning Life’s flagship program, the Family Diplomacy Initiative (learninglife.info/fdi), is developing a family form of citizen diplomacy to help democratize diplomacy. Paul holds a B.A. in sociology from Georgetown University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Before founding Learning Life in 2012, he taught at Stetson, Harvard, Tufts and the University of Wisconsin. Paul’s writing, research and programmatic work focus on the intersection of democracy, culture and education. His writings have appeared in academic journals as well as popular media including the Boston Globe, Chicago Tribune, Orlando Sentinel, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, and Albuquerque Journal, and truthout.org. More at Paul’s Linkedin page (https://www.linkedin.com/in/paullachelier/) and his website (paullachelier.info).