• Position
    • Primary Discipline
    • Expertise
    • Approach
    • Methods
    Members
    Tim Cavell
    Faculty Member
    Psychology
    Professor
    University of Arkansas
    Dept. of Psychological Science
    tcavell@uark.edu
    Twitter
    Kirsten Christensen
    Graduate Student
    Psychology
    Ms.
    University of Massachusetts Boston
    UMB Center for Evidence Based Mentoring
    Kirsten.Christens001@umb.edu
    Biographical Info

    Kirsten Christensen is a Ph.D. candidate in Clinical Psychology and National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow at the University of Massachusetts Boston


    Kimberly Chu
    Other
    Education/Special Education
    Associate Director
    CUNY - Baruch College
    CUNY - Hunter College
    kimberly.chu@baruch.cuny.edu
    Kimberly Chu
    Faculty Member
    Education/Special Education
    Associate Director
    CUNY - Baruch College
    CUNY - Hunter College
    kchu@hunter.cuny.edu
    Research Summary

    My research and area of focus is on mentoring and the impact it has on international students through their college career.


    Biographical Info

    Kimberly Chu currently serves as the Associate Director for Executives on Campus at the City University of New York - Baruch College. Kimberly began her career with the City University of New York in 2004, working at both Hunter College and Borough of Manhattan Community College. Kimberly has extensive experience in career development working with students one-on-one and in groups in areas such as resume writing, interview building, networking, branding, career exploration and interpretation of career assessments. Kimberly holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Stony Brook University in Sociology & Business Management, a Master’s of Science degree in Counseling from the City University of New York, Hunter College and an Ed.D from Northeastern University in Educational Leadership specializing in Higher Education Administration.


    Veronique Church-Duplessis
    Other
    Other
    Director of Research and Evaluation
    Canadian Mentoring Partnership
    Canadian Centre for Mentoring Research
    veronique.church-duplessis@mentoringcanada.ca
    Canadian Mentoring Partnership
    Research Summary

    Véronique is leading the Canadian Mentoring Partnership's first-ever national study of mentoring in Canada. The State of Mentoring Research Initiative focuse on:

    Mapping the mentoring experiences of youth — Survey of 3,000 young adults across Canada to determine whether youth mentoring needs are being met and assess where mentoring gaps and opportunities exist

    Capturing the landscape of mentoring programs and services — Survey and discussions with representatives from community organizations and the research, youth development, government, philanthropic and corporate sectors to understand the prevalence, practices, and scope of mentoring programs in Canada

    The State of Mentoring Research Initiative will support the development of tools and resources to improve the quality of mentoring services in Canada.


    Biographical Info

    Véronique leads the Canadian Mentoring Partnership's research agenda, with a focus on mapping the mentoring landscape in Canada and identifying service gaps. She is also a co-lead of the Canadian Centre for Mentoring Research along with the University of Alberta and the Alberta Mentoring Partnership. Véronique is committed to knowledge mobilization and uses the new research to bridge the gap between academic researchers and community organizations. Prior to joining CMP, Véronique led programs focused on promoting healthy relationships for youth and violence prevention. Véronique holds two degrees in history, a PhD from the University of Toronto and a Master of Arts from the Université de Montréal.


    Margriet Clement
    Faculty Member
    Education/Special Education

    Rotterdam University of applied sciences
    Center of expertise social innovation
    m.h.m.clement@hr.nl
    Mentoren op Zuid
    Stacey Dakin
    Other
    National Senior Director Strategic Projects and Initiatives
    Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada
    Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada
    stacey.dakin@bigbrothersbigsisters.ca
    Twitter
    Ben Dantzer
    Graduate Student
    Education/Special Education
    Ph.D. Candidate
    The University of British Columbia
    dantzerben@gmail.com
    Peter De Cuyper
    Researcher
    Public/Social Policy, Social Work, Sociology

    University of Leuven
    Research institute for work and society
    peter.decuyper@kuleuven.be
    https://hiva.kuleuven.be/nl/medewerkers/00004832
    Biographical Info

    Peter De Cuyper is integration expert and research manager at the Research Institute for Work and Society (HIVA) at the university of Leuven. His main research domains are labour market integration of migrants and migrant integration policies. Currently, he focuses on the impact of labor market policies on immigrant employment, integration policies towards highly skilled newcomers and mentoring schemes for new migrants.


    Lonneke de Meijer
    Faculty Member
    Education/Special Education, Psychology
    Ph.D.
    Erasmus University Rotterdam
    department of Psychology, Education & Child Studies
    demeijer@essb.eur.nl
    Website
    Research Summary

    De Meijer, L.A.L. (2018, April). Mentoring Urban Talent. Presentation at Erasmus+ Steering Group Meeting, Riga, Letland.

    Meeuwisse, M., De Meijer, L.A.L., Born, M.Ph., Severiens, S.E. (2017). The work-study interface: Similarities and differences between ethnic minority and ethnic majority students. Higher Education, 73, 261-280.

    De Meijer, L. (2008). Ethnicity effects in police officer selection: Applicant, assessor, and selection-method factors. Doctoral dissertation, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands.


    Biographical Info

    Lonneke de Meijer is a psychologist and educational scientist. She is working as assistant professor at the department of Psychology, Education & Child Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam in The Netherlands. Her research focuses on school careers, transition, and teacher professionalization, all in the urban diversified context. At the moment, she is scientific leader of a project into mentoring of talented urban youth.


    Kelsey Deane
    Faculty Member
    Psychology
    Dr
    University of Auckland
    Campus Connections Aotearoa
    k.deane@auckland.ac.nz
    Iyasu Dereja

    Other

    Enzira University
    Enzira University
    vetscho@gmail.com
    Agathe DIRANI
    Researcher
    Education/Special Education, Sociology
    Researcher
    Article 1 - Frateli Lab
    Institut de recherche sur l'Education (IREDU), Université de Bourgogne
    agathe.dirani@fratelilab.fr
    Research Summary

    Students from an underprivileged background do face specific forms of socialization due to their experience of social mobility. In this context, we try to understand the construction of their representations regarding their own trajectories and more specifically on what they define as a success in their trajectory. Thanks to qualitative and quantitative longitudinal methods including mentees and mentors, we analyse the effects of the mentoring programme on the construction of these representations and their subjective experience of social mobility.

    Allouch, Annabelle, et Hélène Buisson-Fenet. « Diversification des élites et repositionnement organisationnel ». Cahiers de la recherche sur l’éducation et les savoirs, no 7, 2008, 155‑71.
    Clemence, Alain, Willem Doise, et Fabio Lorenzi-Cioldi. The Quantitative Analysis of Social Representations. Routledge, 2014.
    Jaquet, Chantal. 2014. Les transclasses, ou, La non-reproduction. 1re édition. Paris: Presses universitaires de France.
    Negura, Lilian. « L’analyse de contenu dans l’étude des représentations sociales ». SociologieS, 2006, 1-16.
    Orange, Sophie. 2013. « L’autre enseignement supérieur: les BTS et la gestion des aspirations scolaires ». Paris: Presses universitaires de France.
    Pagis, Julie, et Pasquali, Paul, Observer les mobilités sociales en train de se faire, Observing Social Mobility in the Making. Politix, n°14, 2016, 7–20.
    Pasquali, Paul. « Les enfants de l’« ouverture sociale » Agora débats/jeunesses, no 53, 2001, 117‑34.
    Truong, Fabien, Jeunesses françaises, Paris : La découverte, 2015


    Biographical Info

    After a Master Degree in Political sciences I work on public projects directed to young people with the French Ministry of Youth (INJEP). Then I completed a PhD in Education from the University of Burgundy in 2017. I worked on creativity as a specific ressource having impacts on educational and professional inequalities. As a researcher on the Mentoring programme set up by the french NGO Article 1, I work on measuring the social mobility of students and the subjective experience of this mobility with a focus on the mentees representations of success. I also work on what really counts in the Mentoring programme settings.


    Keywords: inequalities, social justice, creativity, mentoring, social mobility, youth trajectories
    Alison Drew
    Postdoctoral Fellow
    Social Work
    Postdoctoral Fellow
    Boston University
    alison.l.drew@gmail.com
    Biographical Info

    My research focuses on individual, relational and organizational factors that influence youth mentoring relationships, using quantitative and qualitative methods to enhance the quality and quantity of youth mentoring relationships through evidence-informed practice. I previously worked as a Match Support Specialist at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Massachusetts Bay and served as an AmeriCorps Ambassador of Mentoring at Mass Mentoring Partnership.


    Gizem Erdem
    Faculty Member
    Psychology, Other
    Assistant Professor
    Koç University
    gizemerdem@ku.edu.tr
    Website
    Research Summary

    My research interests are program development and evaluation targeting at-risk youth and their families. I am particularly interested in interventions that promote positive youth development and resilience among youth via fostering functional family processes and healthy adult-youth relationships. I have been interested in youth mentoring research since my post-doctoral year. I have projects that investigate the role natural mentoring relationships for at-risk youth, examine the impact of peer mentoring for mentors and mentees and their parents as well as cultural variations in youth mentoring. Me and my colleagues have developed a rehabilitation model for youth in probation where probation officers assess and advocate for youth's needs to prevent recidivism. Our model (inspired by youth mentoring practices and evidence based family therapy for juvenile delinquents) is currently running in 21 cities across Turkey.


    Biographical Info

    Gizem Erdem is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Koç University, İstanbul, Turkey. She is a licensed marriage and family therapist and a clinical supervisor. She obtained her BA degree in Psychology from Boğaziçi University, Turkey and her MS and PhD in Human Development and Family Science (with specialization in Couple and Family Therapy) from the Ohio State University, US. She was a post-doc researcher at University of Illinois at Chicago from January through December 2014 and a visiting scholar at Harvard University in Summer 2017. She was awarded 2013 NCFR Student Award, 2018 NCFR President for a day Award in the US and 2019 Academy of Sciences Young Scientist Award in Turkey for her research with marginalized youth and families. She consults UNODC, Turkish Ministry of Justice, NMRC and UNICEF in evidence-based practices to reduce youth delinquency, crime, and substance abuse.


    Sam Flaherty
    Undergraduate
    Social Work
    Program Coordinator
    Wimmera Southern Mallee LLEN - MATES Mentoring Program
    sam.flaherty@llen.com.au
    MATES Mentoring Website
    Research Summary

    As part of my third year studies I undertook a research project in conjunction with the MATES Mentoring Program.
    The DeckHeads Project: The primary focus of the research is to establish whether an alternate artistic project can create positive life experiences in disengaged youth. To be able achieve, this I requested that each participant design and create their own unique skateboard decks with the themes “what makes me happy now” and “what will make me happy in the future?”. The created artworks were then displayed at The Horsham Regional Art Gallery where an event was held to launch the exhibition of artwork. Participants, teaching staff, parents/guardians, partner organisations and members of the community were invited to the event to showcase the creations. Each artist was awarded with a customised certificate with their name and the name of their skateboard deck in recognition of their contributions in participating in the project. The decks planned to be on display at the Horsham Regional Art Gallery for the week following the launch – this has hence been extended due to interest in the project from the public and the extended availability of the presentation space. Two weeks after the launch of the exhibition, participants were asked to complete a survey based on their experiences throughout the DeckHeads Project – these survey results are what will be analysed to determine if alternate art projects can create positive life experiences in youth.


    Biographical Info

    I currently coordinate the MATES Mentoring Program which provides positive role models who mentor, assist, target, engage and enhance the skills and life experiences of young people. MATES matches young people (mentees) with a volunteer (mentor) from the local community. Mentors and mentees catch up for one hour, once a fortnight for one year. MATES is a great way to volunteer in the community.


    Viola Fransman
    Researcher
    Applied Sciences, Psychology, Public/Social Policy
    dr
    Petra Institute for Children's Ministry
    viola@petracol.org.za
    Research Summary

    The theme of my study was the role of Christian Mentoring in Positive Youth Development Programs in the Hex River Valley, I used my experience as a resident of the Hex River Valley, facilitator and mentor of Children’s Ministry to compose a description of the role of Christian mentoring as part of Positive Youth Development Programs in the context of the Hex River Valley. The study concluded that mentoring for children between the ages of six and twelve years old do not intentionally happen within the planned programmes and initiatives for children of that age in the Christian faith community. Mentoring for younger children happen as part of the broader community they are part of. A neighbour, parent, a grandparent, or a close family friend is more likely to mentor children between the ages of six to twelve year old then the Christian Community they are part of.


    Biographical Info

    I work as a research assistant at the Petra Institute for Children's Ministry. I did my PhD studies on the role of Christian Mentoring for six to twelve-year-old children in a rural poverty context.


    Agathe Gabillaud
    Graduate Student
    Psychology
    Phd student in social psychology
    Université Paris Cité
    Télémaque & LaPEA
    agathe.gabillaud@telemaque.org
    Linkedin
    Research Summary

    My thesis focus on how mentoring reduces self-selection of low SES student. I suggest that the mentor, by his encouragement and sharing of experiences, increase student self-efficacy. Feeling more self-efficacy would reduce the perception of barriers in academic orientation, such as lack of money, family pressure, lack of self-confidence, etc.


    Judie GANNON
    Faculty Member
    Other
    Dr
    Oxford Brookes University
    Oxford Brookes University
    jmgannon@brookes.ac.uk
    International Centre for Coaching & Mentoring Studies STAMINa network
    Twitter
    Research Summary

    My research focus is on mentoring (and coaching) and specifically the management of formal mentoring schemes. I have recently published a report Many things to Many People: Formal Mentoring Schemes and their Management 2019. This is first widescale study of formal mentoring schemes, their organisation and those that operate them. This is based on a mixed methods study of formal mentoring schemes and their management. I have researched and written on mentoring in organisations, mentoring as a socialisation practice and various aspects of IHRM for a range of publications - peer reviewed academic journals (International Journal of Human Resource Management) and practitioner journals (Coaching at Work).


    Biographical Info

    I am a senior lecturer in the International Centre for Coaching & Mentoring Studies (ICCaMs). I lead and teach and supervise on our Doctorate in Coaching & Mentoring, and also teach on our MA in Coaching and Mentoring Practice and the MA/MSc programmes in HRM. I also undertake doctoral research supervision across the Business School. I also support the delivery of our ILM Level 7 in Executive Coaching and Mentoring certificate and organise the Oxford Brookes Coaching & Mentoring Society (OBCaMs) network events across the academic year. I am a member of the core team of the PESE Sustainable Mentoring schemes initiative at Oxford Brookes University and lead the STAMINa Mentoring Network which focuses on sharing best practice across mentoring schemes and offering support to mentoring scheme coordinators. In 2008/9 I founded the Bacchus Mentoring programme and subsequently supported several other University departments (Accountancy, Real Estate and Law) in setting up and running Alumni mentoring schemes.


    Leah Glass
    Researcher
    Education/Special Education, Ethnography, Sociology
    Associate Director of Organizational Learning
    iMentor
    CUNY Graduate Center
    lglass@imentor.org
    Research Summary

    Leah Glass is a current PhD student in sociology at the Graduate Center, CUNY. Her research examines how racism is manifested in various institutions: non-profits, the education system, and even soccer. Her current work explores how "diversity" discourse and initiatives are experienced by staff at non-profits and reproduce racist structures.

    Leah is a critical, mixed-methods researcher. Formally trained in quantitative methods from NYU's Applied Quantitative Research program, she frequently uses ethnography, participant observation, and interviews in conjunction with surveys and other quantitative analyses.


    Konrad Glogowski
    Researcher
    Education/Special Education
    Director, Research and Evaluation
    Pathways to Education
    kglogowski@pathwayscanada.ca
    Website
    Twitter
    Research Summary

    I am interested in exploring the impact of mentoring, both community- and school-based, on the development of non-cognitive sills in adolescents as well as their academic attainment and trajectories into adulthood. I am particularly interested in how mentoring can support marginalized youth, including youth living in contexts of risk and disadvantage, first generation youth, refugee and newcomer populations. My work in the non-profit sector focuses on improving programming through research and evaluation, student-centred approaches, meaningful integration of technology, innovative professional communities of practice, and peer mentorship networks.


    Biographical Info

    Konrad Glogowski holds a Ph.D. degree in Education from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto, with a focus on adolescent literacy and teacher development and a Master of Arts in Teaching from the same institution. His experience in education spans several continents and a variety of teaching, research, and program development roles.

    Konrad is currently Director of Research and Evaluation at Pathways to Education Canada, a national charitable organization that strives to provide at-risk youth with the support they need to complete school, achieve their full potential, break the cycle of poverty, and contribute back to their communities. Konrad’s research interests focus on community-based research and adolescent learning and development, with a particular focus on mentoring and student-centred programming for marginalized students.


    Grace Gowdy
    Faculty Member
    Social Work
    Assistant Faculty
    North Carolina A&T
    ggowdy@bu.edu
    Biographical Info

    Grace Gowdy (Ph.D., Boston University), Assistant Professor. Dr. Gowdy's research interests include community and family influence on individual upward mobility, with a particular focus on the adolescent and young adult stages. Her dissertation was on informal mentors and their ability to promote economic upward mobility for low-income youth. Dr. Gowdy currently works on multiple studies examining formal and informal mentoring relationships, all surrounding how caring non-parental adults can influence young people's chances of mobility.


    Nicolas Greenfield
    Other
    Other
    Coordinator, Development & Training
    YMCAs of Quebec
    nicolas.greenfield@ymcaquebec.org
    Plusone Mentoring
    Johanna Greeson
    Faculty Member
    Social Work
    Associate Professor
    University of Pennsylvania
    School of Social Policy & Practice
    jgreeson@sp2.upenn.edu
    Website
    Twitter
    Research Summary

    The transition to adulthood among youth who age out of foster care
    Natural mentoring and other supportive adult relationships for youth who age out of foster care
    Child traumatic stress
    Applied community-based intervention research and translation of research to practice
    Resiliency, risk, and protective factors
    Neurobiological mechanisms of resiliency-focused interventions
    Life course theory
    Domestic minor sex trafficking


    Biographical Info

    Johanna Greeson, PhD, MSS. MLSP, is an Associate Professor at the School of Social Policy & Practice at the University of Pennsylvania. She is passionate about reforming the child welfare system, using research to build better futures for youth who age out of foster care, and realizing the power of connections to caring adults for all vulnerable youth. Her research agenda is resiliency-focused and based in the strengths and virtues that enable foster youth to not only survive but thrive. Dr. Greeson’s published work includes scholarly articles on natural mentoring, evidence-based practices for older youth in foster care, including independent living programming, residential group care, and intensive in-home therapy, low-income homeownership, child/adolescent traumatic stress, and domestic minor sex trafficking. Her work has been cited over 1,000 times in the scientific, peer-reviewed literature. She is the developer of Caring Adults ‘R’ Everywhere (C.A.R.E.), a novel, trauma-informed natural mentoring intervention for older youth in foster care, intended to solve the aging out dilemma. Dr. Greeson received her PhD in social work from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2009 and completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at Duke University with the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress in 2012. She is also an alumna of Swarthmore, where she majored in Sociology/Anthropology – Education and graduated in 1997. She received her Master of Social Service and Master of Law & Social Policy degrees from Bryn Mawr in 2001. She joined the faculty of the School of Social Policy Practice at Penn in 2012.


    Matthew Hagler
    Faculty Member
    Psychology
    Assistant Professor of Psychology
    Francis Marion University
    Matthew.Hagler@fmarion.edu

    Twitter
    Linkedin
    Research Summary

    I am interested in many/most aspects of mentoring! I have studied both naturalistic and formal mentoring relationships. I use a range of quantitative (e.g., longitudinal modeling, latent profile analysis, metaanalysis) and qualitative (e.g., thematic analysis) approaches. I have increasingly focused on the role of mentoring in late adolescence, the transition to adulthood, and higher education, though I'm also interested in other developmental stages.

    Some of my emergent areas of interest include:
    - Utilizing of technology to facilitated both naturalistic and formal mentoring relationships
    - Applying a social justice lens to critically evaluate mentoring theories and interventions
    - Understanding mentoring relationships within broader social networks and contexts
    - Training, supervising, and integrating paraprofessional mentors in schools and mental health care systems

    I am interested in establishing and strengthening both US-based and international collaborations!


    Biographical Info

    Dr. Matthew Hagler is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Francis Marion University in Florence, South Carolina, USA. He completed his Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and English from Sewanee, the University of the South, a Fulbright fellowship at Muğla Sıtkı Koçman Üniversitesi in Turkey, and his Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology from the University of Massachusetts Boston. His graduate work was supported by a Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation. Following graduate school, Dr. Hagler completed two years of full-time clinical training as a predoctoral intern and postdoctoral associate at the Yale School of Medicine.

    Dr. Hagler’s research investigates the antecedents, processes, and outcomes of social support. Much of this work has focused on intergenerational mentoring relationships between youth and non-parent adults – including formalized relationships within organized youth programs (e.g., Big Brothers Big Sisters) and bonds that arise organically within families, schools, extracurricular activities, and communities. His research is highly interdisciplinary, utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methods while integrating clinical, community, educational, and developmental psychology.


    Keywords: formal mentoring; natural mentoring; longitudinal; metaanalysis; qualitative; higher education; social justice; technology; mental health
    Rachel Halzel

    Youth Advocacy Manager
    Buddy Mentors at Bright Future Foundation
    rachel@mybrightfuture.org
    Buddy Mentors
    Matt Hanson
    Other
    Niganawenimaanaanig Program Student Mentor
    Bemidji State University
    Niganawenimaanaanig Indigenous Nursing Program
    matthew.hanson@bemidjistate.edu
    Jenna Harmon
    Researcher
    Other
    Mentorship Research Lead
    Mentor Collective
    jenna@mentorcollective.org
    Kathy Hauser

    Director of Service Delivery
    BBBS of Saskatoon and Area, Inc.
    kathy.hauser@bigbrothersbigsisters.ca
    Biographical Info

    Kathy Hauser has worked at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Saskatoon and Area, Inc. for over 20 years. She has been in her current role as the Director of Service Delivery since 2006.


    Eline Heppe
    Postdoctoral Fellow
    Other
    Postdoc
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
    e.c.m.heppe@vu.nl
    Biographical Info

    I am a behavioural scientist with a special interest in research among young people with disabilities and their families. My PhD research on mentoring and social participation of young people with a visual impairment; explored new ways to support young people with disabilities.